Posts Tagged adoptions

Ukraine continues adoptions

Last Alert from the Department of State:

On July 14, 2011, the presidential order which extends the State Department on Adoption’s (SDA’s) authority to process adoptions was published in Ukraine. We have been informed by the SDA that they have resumed processing adoption applications. As described in a previous alert, the SDA will have the authority to continue processing adoptions until the Ministry of Social policy is ready to take over as the new adoption authority in Ukraine. The Ministry does not yet know when they will be prepared to take over adoption processing.

The SDA also informed the embassy that the new amendment to the Family Code is now in effect. This requires orphans to be registered on the central adoption registry for one year and to be at least five years old before they are eligible for intercountry adoption. The amendment exempts children with certain special needs, relative adoptions, and sibling adoptions. Please note that the Ukrainian government is in the process of updating the definition of special needs, a process which by law should be completed by October 11, 2011.

We will continue to encourage the Ministry of Social Policy to protect adoptions where U.S. prospective adoptive parents have already been approved by the SDA to adopt a particular child. We will also be following new developments closely to understand how they will affect the families currently in process and will be posting relevant updates.

 

For more information about Ukraine, please click HERE

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Russia and U.S. sign new adoption accord

To learn more about the accord, please visit the “Intercountry Adoption” website.

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India develops new adoption guidelines

India released new proposed adoption guidelines on July 1, 2011.   The guidelines are to become final when published in the Gazette.  However, it may take many more months or years before the guidelines are implemented.  You can read the new guidelines at the website of the Central Adoption Resource Authority (CARA).

http://adoptionindia.nic.in/guideline-family/new_guideline.html

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Russia and U.S. expected to sign adoption accord

Russia and the U.S. have been negotiating greater protections for adopted children since the case of the 7 year old boy who was returned to Russia by his adoptive mother after she put him on a plane by himself with a note explaining that he had special needs. The two countries are expected to sign an agreement in mid-July, 2011 during a visit to Washington D.C. by Russian officials. For more, read Click here

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New program in Mexico

Bienvenidos! Across The World Adoptions is proud to announce we have received approval to assist with adoptions from Jalisco, Mexico.  We share a long border with our Mexican neighbors, who are a warm and friendly people.  Mexico is also well known for her beautiful beaches, historical and archeological treasures and popular cuisine.

Mexico is a Hague adoption country and applicants will need to file an I-800A form with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS). This is a pilot program and families must be flexible and be prepared for changes or delays in the program as it unfolds.  At this time, our program is limited to the adoption of children from the Mexican state of Jalisco, which includes the cities of Guadalajara and Puerto Vallarta.  We regret that we are unable to assist with adoptions from any other Mexican state.

Dual Mexican and U.S. nationals and families adopting relatives must complete plenary (or plena) adoptions and the entire Hague adoption process.  Simple adoptions are not accepted.  Adoptions completed solely under Mexican law, will not qualify the child for a visa for admission to the U.S.

Please review the website of the U.S. Department of State on adopting from Mexico, including the latest notices and alerts:
http://adoption.state.gov/country_information/country_specific_info.php?country-select=mexico

 

The Children:

  • Children identified for international adoption are 5+ years old.
  • Or are in a group of siblings that includes at least one older child.
  • Or the child may have a special need.  It is possible the special need may be a minor or correctable medical condition.
  • This is not a program for families who are only interested in adopting a healthy infant.
  • Children who are related to applicants may also be adopted, but Hague adoption requirements must still be observed.
  • Children may come into orphanage care for a variety of reasons including economic or social pressures, neglect or abuse.
  • Children most often are Hispanic, but some may also have other heritage as well.

Eligible Applicants:

  • At least one spouse must be a U.S. citizen.  The U.S. citizen parent must be the petitioner on the I-800A and be present for most adoption processing. The U.S. citizen parent may also be a Mexican national.  The other parent need not be a U.S. citizen but must be legally admitted to the U.S.  We are not currently able to assist U.S. citizens living abroad (including those residing in Mexico) or couples where neither parent is a U.S. citizen.
  • Jalisco requires a heterosexual couple with a marriage of at least five years .
  • The minimum age is usually 25 years and parents must be 15-17 years older than the child.  The age of the parents is considered when Mexico provides a referral.
  • Preference may be given to families without other children.
  • Applicants must be able to demonstrate a health status appropriate for their role as parents.  In general, you should not have degenerative or infectious diseases, but some health conditions are acceptable.

Adoption Process:

  • Applicants must be prepared to undertake a home study by an agency licensed in their state of U.S. residence.  We are not able to accept home studies from independent social workers.
  • Complete adoption education during home study.
  • Apply for I-800A approval from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (CIS).
  • Prepare dossier of documents required by Mexico.  Mexico will require a psychological report separate from the home study.
  • Wait for a referral from the adoption authority in Mexico (6-12 months anticipated, but could be longer), if not a relative.
  • Accept referral and file I-800 with CIS.
  • Travel to Jalisco for first trip, meet and bond with the child(ren) for 3-5 weeks through visits to the Children’s Home.
  • Legal preparations and court proceedings may take 5-6 months.
  • Travel to Jalisco for second trip of about 2-4 weeks to conclude adoption process and then proceed to Mexico City for passport and U.S. embassy visa processing.
  • Return to U.S.  Your child is then an automatic U.S. citizen upon entry!
  • Complete four post-adoption reports through adoption agency at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after home coming.  Post-adoption requirements can and do change.
  • Re-adoption in the U.S. is strongly recommended.

Fees and Expenses:

Program fees encompass all professional services for the adoption.  Additional expenses include the home study and psychological report, CIS fees, document preparation, travel, US visa fees and post-adoption.  A federal tax credit up to $13,170 is available to offset adoption fees and expenses.

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